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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Ways You Can Improve Your Resume

Posted Monday, November 21, 2011, at 4:06 AM

Writing a work resume that captures the attention of a potential employer and conveys the feeling of integrity and enthusiasm of the applicant is truly an art form, but it does not take a master prose stylist to construct one. There are a few guidelines that will make all the difference between a poorly arranged resume that reeks of frailty on the part of the author, and one that stands out from all the rest. And getting help from a professional resume writing service can be invaluable, especially in today's world of online visual effects and imagery.

Use Proper Grammar And Structure

One of the most common mistakes people make when writing a resume is to overuse pronouns. A resume does not follow the normal rules of English grammar, so most of what was learned in language class does not apply. For example, avoid the word "I" as much as possible. Instead of stating "I was a produce department manager at ABC Supermarket and I supervised four employees", simply say "Worked as produce manager at ABC Supermarket and supervised four employees".

Also make sure that all slang and commonly used jargon is eliminated. Do not say something like "Was totally into my work, and came up with nifty solutions to some of the probs associated with my duties". Much better would be "Concentrated on making the routines more time-efficient, and solved a number of major problems associated with product inventory".

Another trap to avoid would be to make sentences filled with unnecessary words. The words "the" and "of" are often overused. Rather than say something like "Managed to accelerate the delivery schedule of product", it would be much better to simply say "accelerated product deliveries".

Write In Short Sentences

Nothing bores a reader of resumes more than long, drawn out sentences. Commas are excellent when used in an article such as this one, but are generally to be avoided when composing a resume. Instead, break things up into short sentences that have a direct point. A good example would be "Managed several employees in the product inventory department. Oversaw the compiling of product numbers. Noted the amount of waste material. Supervised relocation of items to correct storage bins."

When writing about former job duties, it is best to start out with a sentence that is rather general in nature, followed by more specific details in the sentences that follow. In other words, the first sentence in the paragraph should be something that identifies the overall topic.

List Things Appropriately

One paragraph after another can look confusing to someone trying to make sense out of what the author is trying to say. Instead, try using bullet points to make certain facts stand out. Bullet lists always look professional, and the eyes of the reader are naturally drawn to them. Bullet statements always look their best when they are composed the very same way. If the first bullet phrase begins with a verb, so should the others. This is known as parallel statements.

Get Professional Help

There are a number of excellent firms specializing in the writing and formatting online resumes. A resume writing service can add style and appeal to the visuals and can transform a seemingly bland text into something that truly keeps the reader engaged. An example of what a professional resume writing service can do is found here.

Don't be scared about composing a resume. Follow these simple strategies and seek advice from a company that prepares these important documents for job applicants, inventors, contractors and others wanting to make the very best first impression.



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I am a masters level career counselor. I am internationally certified as a Career Management Practitioner (CMP) by the Institute for Career Certification International and have been recognized as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) through the National Board for Certified Counselors.